How To Prepare Your Pool For A Hurricane

Hurricane Symbol

Do you know how to prepare your pool for a hurricane? Get prepared now so you know what to do when one is approaching us. Aegean Pools hopes this article answers some of your questions.

First and foremost, your personal safety should be your biggest concern. The pool can be repaired and even replaced, you can’t! Protect yourself first!

Rain is one of the biggest by-products of a hurricane.  During a hurricane the ground can become very saturated.  If you have a vinyl-lined pool the liner may float or appear as though air is under the liner after a large amount of rain. This occurs because the ground is so saturated that the water has nowhere to go. Think of a sponge, it can only hold so much water. If the water pressure in the ground is greater than that in the pool, this can cause your liner to float. Keeping the water at the highest level (no higher than the top of the skimmer.) can help keep the liner from floating. However, in extreme weather situations it’s usually futile.  If water gets over the top of the skimmer it may go behind the liner and cause the liner to float and or bulge away from the wall of the pool.  We recommend if the forecasters predict high levels of precipitation that you drain the pool to the bottom of the mouth of the skimmer at the last possible moment.  To keep the water at the bottom of the skimmer during the storm use an automatic submersible pump (with a flat bottom.).  Place this pump on the top step and leave on.  When a floating liner recedes it may leave wrinkles behind.  If the wrinkles are not bad, and depending on the condition of the liner, the wrinkles may be worked out.  Time is of the essence and wrinkles should be removed as soon as possible so call our service department after the storm to schedule any necessary repairs.

Too much ground water can cause a concrete or fiberglass pool to “float” out of the ground.  Most concrete and fiberglass pools are installed with a hydrostatic relief valve in the main drain.  This valve is designed to open if the water pressure under the pool is greater than the pressure in the pool thus keeping the pool in the ground.  In excessive ground water situations even the hydrostat may not be enough.

If at all possible, try to keep the water level pumped down to the proper level in a vinyl liner pool. In a concrete or fiberglass pool the more water the better. So don’t drain any water – some storms don’t actually produce rain and it could be a waste of chemicals.

Here are some other good tips:

  • Don’tput your patio furniture in the pool during a hurricane! You can damage your pool, the liner, and your furniture and deposit unwanted metals in the pool water that may cause stains in the pool.
  • Store pool accessories and patio furniture in a shed, garage, or pool house.
  • Only venture outside to drain the pool when it’s absolutely safe.  As we noted earlier we can fix your pool but you are more difficult to repair.  Your safety is far more important than your pool.
  • Once the hurricane has passed, shock the pool (if you have power and the pump will circulate the pool water) then bring us a sample, especially if you haven’t winterized. Remember water chemistry is important this time of the year.  Don’t shock the pool or add any type of chlorine if the pump is not working as this may damage the pool surface.
  • Don’t cover your above ground pool.
  • You may cover an in-ground pool if you have a safety cover.  Keep in mind that it may wear the paint off the coping around the pool, as high winds will cause the cover to flap.  If you have a cantilever deck it could cause premature wear on the cover.
  • Don’t use an inflatable dome or any dome enclosures over the pool.  The high winds will blow them away.
  • If you are leaving the house turn the pool equipment off at the circuit breaker.
  • If you would like to add and algaecide before the storm to help prevent algae growth please call us for a recommendation at 757-436-0038